How Republicans are fighting back against the media and the alt-right

Posted September 30, 2018 12:24:24 Republicans are pushing back against President Donald Trump’s media war with the alt right and white supremacists, who have seized the GOP leadership in Congress.

In the wake of the Charlottesville, Virginia, rally on Aug. 12, 2018, the GOP has moved aggressively to distance itself from the neo-Nazi groups.

But Trump and his top aides have not been as careful to distance themselves from white nationalists.

Trump, meanwhile, has continued to push his alt-light agenda in a way that has alarmed conservatives and alienated moderates, leading to widespread backlash from conservatives and the Trump administration.

“They are a danger to the Republican Party, and they are a threat to the country,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said Monday at a GOP fundraiser.

“The last thing we need is to make it even worse by turning a blind eye to them.”

As a result, the Republican Conference and the White House have issued a series of warnings about the dangers of white nationalism.

The president has been under heavy fire for the first time since the Charlottesville rally for suggesting that white supremacists were to blame for the violence.

“Maybe the alt left is to blame,” Trump said at a White House news conference.

“If they did it, they should be blamed, too.

And they are not.”

Trump said on Aug 5 that “it’s been very interesting” that a “small group” of white nationalists had infiltrated his administration.

On Aug. 14, he added, “You know, the alt is not a group that’s a fan of the president.”

“The president was not referring to the alt.

He was referring to a very small group of people,” Sen. Lindsey Graham (R, S.C.) said in an interview with ABC News’ “This Week” on Sunday.

“He’s trying to be provocative.

I think he needs to tone it down a little bit.

“I don’t think we need to go back to that kind of rhetoric,” Sen: Lee on Trump’s ‘alt-left’ remark. “

And on Aug 18, Sen. Mike Lee (R) said on CBS’s “Face the Nation” that the president “did not say this was a ‘group’ of people, but he was referring specifically to the far-left.

“”I don’t think we need to go back to that kind of rhetoric,” Sen: Lee on Trump’s ‘alt-left’ remark.

The White House has also signaled that it is willing to defend Trump from criticism.

On Saturday, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters that “a lot of the rhetoric around the president has taken on a life of its own.”

She also said that Trump’s remarks on the Charlottesville violence “were not in and of themselves racist.”

On Aug 17, Sanders said that the White of the House “has always been in lockstep” with the president’s position that the altright is a “very real, very dangerous movement.”

But she added, that the comments were made “in an extremely personal way” and “that we’ve seen from a lot of people on the left, that they’ve been using these kind of divisive language against the president in a very divisive way.”

Trump has also been a target for some Republicans.

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R.-Wis.) said on “Meet the Press” on Aug 14 that “the alt right is the real problem” and that Trump needs to be “more vocal.”

Collins also said on ABC News on Sunday that “there are people who have called for his impeachment for lying about the Charlottesville incident, for the White house to call for his removal and for him to resign.” “

He has to make clear to the American people that the Alt Right is a real threat to our country and to American values,” she said.

Collins also said on ABC News on Sunday that “there are people who have called for his impeachment for lying about the Charlottesville incident, for the White house to call for his removal and for him to resign.”

“We can’t be complicit in the crimes that have been committed by those in power,” Collins said.

Trump has since issued a sweeping apology for his remarks and vowed to hold the alt white nationalist group accountable.

He also said he has “serious reservations” about the far left’s ability to influence the Republican conference and that he plans to “reject” a proposed merger of the GOP.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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